Investigating the nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in native membranes by atomic force microscopy

Subhadip Senapati, Paul Shin-Hyun Park

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Membrane proteins play an integral role in cellular communication. They are often organized within the crowded cell membrane into nanoscale domains (i.e., nanodomains), which facilitates their function in cell signaling processes. The visualization of membrane proteins and nanodomains within biological membranes under physiological conditions presents a challenge and is not possible using conventional microscopy methods. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides an opportunity to study the organization of membrane proteins within biological membranes with sub-nanometer resolution. An example of a membrane protein organized into nanodomains is rhodopsin. Rhodopsin is expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina and upon photoactivation initiates a series of biochemical reactions called phototransduction, which represents the first steps of vision. AFM has provided an opportunity to directly visualize the packing of rhodopsin in native retinal membranes and the quantitative analysis of AFM images is beginning to reveal insights about the nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in the membrane. In this report, we outline procedures for imaging rhodopsin nanodomains by AFM and the quantitative analysis of those AFM images.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages61-74
Number of pages14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1886
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Photoreceptor Cells
Rhodopsin
Atomic Force Microscopy
Membrane Proteins
Membranes
Light Signal Transduction
Retina
Microscopy
Communication
Cell Membrane

Keywords

  • Atomic force microscopy
  • Biological membrane
  • Membrane nanodomains
  • Membrane protein
  • Membrane structure
  • Photoreceptor cell
  • Receptor oligomerization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Senapati, S., & Park, P. S-H. (2019). Investigating the nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in native membranes by atomic force microscopy. In Methods in Molecular Biology (pp. 61-74). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1886). Humana Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8894-5_4

Investigating the nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in native membranes by atomic force microscopy. / Senapati, Subhadip; Park, Paul Shin-Hyun.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2019. p. 61-74 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1886).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Senapati, S & Park, PS-H 2019, Investigating the nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in native membranes by atomic force microscopy. in Methods in Molecular Biology. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1886, Humana Press Inc., pp. 61-74. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8894-5_4
Senapati S, Park PS-H. Investigating the nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in native membranes by atomic force microscopy. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc. 2019. p. 61-74. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-8894-5_4
Senapati, Subhadip ; Park, Paul Shin-Hyun. / Investigating the nanodomain organization of rhodopsin in native membranes by atomic force microscopy. Methods in Molecular Biology. Humana Press Inc., 2019. pp. 61-74 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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